lareviewofbooks:

David Ehrenstein traces the many adaptations of Les Misérables, from Victor Hugo’s epic novel to the musical to the new film:

In the show, “I Dreamed A Dream” belongs to Fantine, a fired factory seamstress forced into prostitution as a last resort. Her final song is a remembrance of her youth, when her dreams for a beautiful life seemed achievable. Fantine’s “What a Life I Could Have Known,” and lyrics like it were obviously applicable to Boyle, a middle-aged woman with learning disabilities who, for most of her life, took care of an ailing mother. Her unselfishness and amazing turn in fortune (she is now a recording artist with three best-selling albums) fit the novel that preceded the musical.

For Fantine, though, things didn’t work out quite so well, as any fan of the musical — with music, lyrics, and libretto by Claude-Michel Schoenberg, Alain Boublil and Jean-Marc Natel, and Herbert Kretzmer, respectively — can tell you. The musical in turn owes its success to Victor Hugo’s 150-year-old epic of poverty and its consequences. Les Misérables has not ceased to stir emotions all along that formidable span of time, most recently in Tom Hooper’s monumental new film adaptation — one of more than 20 cinematic renderings of Les Misérables to date.

Click here to read the rest.

Mar 8 2013
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explore-blog:

Nicolaus Copernicus’s revolutionary 1543 view of the universe was crystallized in this simple yet disconcerting line drawing. His heliocentric model – which placed the Sun and not the Earth and the center of the universe – contradicted 14th-century beliefs and became one of 100 diagrams that changed the world

Feb 19 2013
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Jan 11 2013
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mpdrolet:

Alptransit, SA

Claudio Bader

Jan 11 2013
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antiquatedgenius:

Hieronymus Bosch

(Source: rememberyourgypsy)

Jan 11 2013
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laboratoryequipment:

The Cure for Asking Stupid Questions

NASA has found a cure for a common phobia — the fear of asking “stupid” questions. It’s not a pill. No therapy is required. The cure is a rubber chicken.

That’s right, school kids and even their teachers can find themselves tongue-tied when they come face to face with an astronaut or astrophysicist. This interferes with NASA’s mission to reach out, inspire and educate. “But nobody’s afraid to talk to a rubber chicken,” says Romeo Durscher of Stanford Univ., executive secretary for a fowl NASA ambassador named “Camilla” who’s taking classrooms by storm.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/videos/2012/11/cure-asking-stupid-questions

Nov 15 2012
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modernizing:

Special Gallery In Memory of the Late Maurice Sendak

Renowned author and illustrator Maurice Sendak, most notable for his popular children’s book Where the Wild Things Are, left his creative mark on society that embraced individuality and an appreciation for an active imagination, before he passed away last month. His passing affected many who grew up with his creative cast of characters through childhood and his newly found fans from his recent resurgence in popularity. In memory of the late great visionary, a gallery showing called Maurice Sendak Retrospective is scheduled to run through the summer at AFA Gallery in New York.


The exhibition is set to include 50 original works that include both published and conceptual artistic works. There will also be a bronze “Wild Thing” sculpture that first showed at the SoHo gallery in 2009, where Sendak’s extensive career was celebrated the same year as the big screen debut of his book-turned-film. It feels fitting for this exhibit to be held at AFA whose owner, Nicholas Leone, had a rare friendship with Sendak predating the gallery showing three years ago.

Marice Sendak Retrospective opens on June 9, 2012, what would have been Sendak’s 84th birthday, and will run through Labor Day.

Jun 8 2012
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Pinterest analysis: PBS, USA Today engage with readers most effectively | Poynter.

Jun 1 2012
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12 idioms about time, better later than never

visualoop:

[Infographic provided by Grammar.net]

Jun 1 2012
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